Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.
Live Updates COVID-19 CASES
  • World 19,692,415
    World
    Confirmed: 19,692,415
    Active: 6,329,733
    Recovered: 12,635,798
    Death: 726,884
  • USA 5,114,229
    USA
    Confirmed: 5,114,229
    Active: 2,330,447
    Recovered: 2,619,317
    Death: 164,465
  • South Africa 545,476
    South Africa
    Confirmed: 545,476
    Active: 140,808
    Recovered: 394,759
    Death: 9,909
  • Nigeria 45,687
    Nigeria
    Confirmed: 45,687
    Active: 12,114
    Recovered: 32,637
    Death: 936
  • Kenya 25,837
    Kenya
    Confirmed: 25,837
    Active: 13,520
    Recovered: 11,899
    Death: 418
  • Australia 20,698
    Australia
    Confirmed: 20,698
    Active: 9,100
    Recovered: 11,320
    Death: 278
  • South Sudan 2,450
    South Sudan
    Confirmed: 2,450
    Active: 1,228
    Recovered: 1,175
    Death: 47
  • Uganda 1,267
    Uganda
    Confirmed: 1,267
    Active: 146
    Recovered: 1,115
    Death: 6

Rare dinosaur identified in Australia

290

BBC:A fossil unearthed in Australia by a volunteer digger has been identified as a rare, toothless dinosaur that roamed the country 110 million years ago.

The elaphrosaur, whose name means “light-footed lizard”, was related to the Tyrannosaurus Rex and Velociraptor.

BEST SELLING BOOKS - CLICK HERE TO BUY




The five-centimetre (two-inch) vertebrae fossil was discovered during a dig near Cape Otway in Victoria in 2015.

It is the first elaphrosaur bone ever to be found in Australia.

The fossil was discovered by volunteer Jessica Parker, who was taking part in an annual dig led by Melbourne Museum.

At the time, it was thought to be from a flying reptile called a pterosaur. But when palaeontologists at Swinburne University in Melbourne studied the fossil further, they realised it was a delicately-built dinosaur.

Boy, 10, spots museum dinosaur error
“Elaphrosaurs had long necks, stumpy arms with small hands, and relatively lightly-built bodies,” Dr Stephen Poropat said.




The fossil indicated the animal was about two metres (6.5ft) long. However, other fossils previously found in Tanzania, China and Argentina show that they could reach up to six metres in length.

Adult elaphrosaurs probably didn’t eat much meat, Dr Poropat said.

“As dinosaurs go, they were rather bizarre. The few known skulls of elaphrosaurs show that the youngsters had teeth, but that the adults lost their teeth and replaced them with a horny beak. We don’t know if this is true for the [Australian] elaphrosaur yet – but we might find out if we ever discover a skull,” he said.




Cape Otway, where the fossil was located, is a rich area for discoveries. About a dozen animals and five dinosaur species have been identified there, according to ABC News. Those discovered include a plant-eating dinosaur found in 2018.

For Global News updates click here to Join Our Telegram channel

CORONAVIRUS CASES

Live Updates COVID-19 CASES
  • World 19,692,415
    World
    Confirmed: 19,692,415
    Active: 6,329,733
    Recovered: 12,635,798
    Death: 726,884
  • USA 5,114,229
    USA
    Confirmed: 5,114,229
    Active: 2,330,447
    Recovered: 2,619,317
    Death: 164,465
  • South Africa 545,476
    South Africa
    Confirmed: 545,476
    Active: 140,808
    Recovered: 394,759
    Death: 9,909
  • Nigeria 45,687
    Nigeria
    Confirmed: 45,687
    Active: 12,114
    Recovered: 32,637
    Death: 936
  • Kenya 25,837
    Kenya
    Confirmed: 25,837
    Active: 13,520
    Recovered: 11,899
    Death: 418
  • Australia 20,698
    Australia
    Confirmed: 20,698
    Active: 9,100
    Recovered: 11,320
    Death: 278
  • South Sudan 2,450
    South Sudan
    Confirmed: 2,450
    Active: 1,228
    Recovered: 1,175
    Death: 47
  • Uganda 1,267
    Uganda
    Confirmed: 1,267
    Active: 146
    Recovered: 1,115
    Death: 6
Comments